HOME  
ABOUT US  
RPPN FELICIANO MIGUEL ABDALA

CARATINGA BIOLOGICAL STATION

LOCALIZATION
ECOTURISM
FUTURE PLANS
LINKS
FRIENDS GALLERY
GIVE A HUG
PRESS
EcoBAZAAR
CONTACT
PHOTO GALLERY
     
     
  The Atlantic Forest region of Brazil is one of the richest and most diverse forest systems in the world; it is also one of the most threatened, ranking among the five top biodiversity hotspots on Earth. Although it once covered some 1.2 million km2, it is now down to about 7% of its original extent. Needless to say, many of the animal and plants living in this region are under heavy pressure, and many are now at risk of extinction.

Primates have long been the most important symbols for the Atlantic Forest, and their situation is indicative of what is happening to the region as a whole. Some 24 species and subspecies are found in the Atlantic Forest, of these 15 are now considered endangered or crítically endangered. One of these, the northern muriqui (Brachyteles hipoxanthus), the largest mammal endemic to Brazil and a species of great charm and appeal, ranks high on the list of most endangered primates,
 
and has become a flagship species of enormous importance to Brazil. Only about 500 individuals remain in the wild, and one third of those occur in a single forest, the RPPN (Private Reserve of the Natural Patrimony) Feliciano Abdala, location of the Caratinga Biological Station, in the state of Minas Gerais.